Nick's Gaming Blog

Nick’s Fast Four Picks #2 (12-5-2009)

“You know what, I think you should actually do another one of those ‘fast four picks’ articles,” a friend said to me yesterday.  Like, literally.  We are not discussing the invisible friend who unconditionally loves everything I pen, and laughs at every one of my jokes (he says it’s the best job in the world) but a true, actual person. And no, I did not pay the person and/or threaten them at gunpoint.

My “persuasive” tactics did involve brandishing an Olympic-size javelin menacingly however (it’s the only way to brandish anything, I’m afraid).  Needless to say, I said I’d get around to it, and after spending several hours wandering the Internet, seeking more useless knowledge in general and weighing my possible chances with Tiger Woods’s now likely disgruntled and “rebound-ready” wife, I decided I’d give you guys four more games to buy/rent/unwrap/remember that you actually own/finish/ or whatever. This time around I’ve striven to provide you, the reader with a viable cross-section of gaming.  Specifically, the list includes titles for gamers that regard money as “ain’t being a thing,” those more cost-conscious, and those “bankin’ on C-mass” (that’s my “gang name” for Christmas).  The titles also vary from semi-obscurity to “you’ve seen more than enough 30-second spots for this” as well as in terms of genre; providing 3rd person action/stealth, traditional shooters, and Action/RPG hybrids. Basically what I’m saying is that I’ve spent at least ten minutes planning this list, and if there isn’t something on here that you’re interested in…well…allow me to provide the proper response to these “far and few between” scenarios in which you won’t like ANYTHING on this list:

1.  Look, I get it, you like Madden.  You bought it last year, are currently playing this year’s edition as we speak…err…write, and you have already planted a mole (and knowing your intelligence, possibly the actual rodent) deep within EA, in hopes of being the first to know who will be on the cover of the cause behind the annual casual gamer storming of Wal-Mart…I mean, Madden. And you will unconditionally buy Madden next year as well, all the while completely unaware that your gaming console will not set alight if you put a different game in the disc tray.  So…my recommendations and advice (aside from that fact that I too, indulge in the guilty pleasure that is Madden) are widely irrelevant for you.  How you located this site is beyond me.  But please don’t leave, I need the hits.

2.  People tend to be much more comfortable killing digital images of other humans than animals, be they docile (bunnies), feral (wolves) or fictional/Cryptozoological (unicorns).  For this very reason, there aren‘t any huntin’ games on my list, nor in my own personal gaming collection, unless one is counting Turok (which compensates for the large amount of dino-killin’ by allowing you to murder homo sapiens too!) or the occasional “how’d this zebra end up on my windshield?” moment in Far Cry 2…which I “write-off” as “pro-active conservation efforts.”  I also don’t play/own/review any of said huntin’ genre games, because they suck.  That, and it’s hunting season, so just why you’d be looking for the latest and greatest massacre of Noah’s Ark is beyond me.  Now, because fishing primarily involves sitting, drinking, and getting oneself out of actually doing real work, and, in this light, already has the characteristics of video gaming, “hook and lure” games are alright.

Editor’s Note: Many species of  zebras are actually endangered, apparently, if only for the purpose of being a “major buzzkill” to this already tangental articleSo…don’t kill any, plz.

There are obviously other groups that won’t find anything remotely enjoyable on this list to follow, but as the two examples above suggest, those aren’t the sort of readers I have, nor the readers I want.  Now, to the list!

Nick’s (somewhat delayed, yet nonetheless here) Fast Four Picks

Pick #1 Batman: Arkham Asylum–Okay, so let’s be honest, this is the only game on the list that I have not completed outright.  I was just about to get back into the world of straitjackets, Gothic architecture, and flame-retardant capes when Borderlands came along, informed me that it would kidnap my future children if I played any other games, and promptly took up all of my leisure time.  At least, that’s the only possible theory I have for how it “went down.”

So you're telling me that a veritable "Who's Who" of Archvillans are running amok this sprawling facility?  These people need a 4x5 room with reinforced steel bars, not the cover of next month's Architectural Digest.  Eff my already childhood trauma-addled life.

So you're telling me that a veritable "Who's Who" of Archvillans are running amok this sprawling facility? These people need a 4x5 room with reinforced steel bars, not the cover of next month's issue of "Architectural Digest". Eff my already childhood trauma-addled life.

Anyway, those looking for a quality Batman title (and believe me, unless you have a lenient understanding of the adjective “good” that encompasses the video game tie-in to Batman Begins, or you consider LEGO Batman a real Batman game, its been a REALLY LONG WAIT) can finally turn off the Bat-signal, because it’s here.  This game is a must if you’ve wanted a Batman game that doesn’t have a movie or a television show as its source material (no offense, Batman: The Animated Series) but the actual comics, with the story penned by none other than Paul Dini, the guy behind Batman: War on Crime, amongst other works of wonderfulness.  Adding to the major “street cred” is the fact that Rocksteady Studios managed to get Kevin Conroy and Mark Hamil (Batman and Joker, respectively) to reprise their roles from Batman: The Animated Series.  Like I said, this game was taken very seriously, and not simply viewed as a franchise-whoring opportunity.

Sometimes a kick is not just a kick.  Sometimes it's a kick that really hurts.

Sometimes a kick is not just a kick. Sometimes it's a kick that really hurts.

Why do you have to play it?  Well, for the first time, there’s a Batman game that makes the player genuinely feel like Batman.  Black-belt karate skills?  Check.  Utility belt gadgets?  Check.  Stealthiness in a game that actually makes you feel like the hunter and not the prey?  Check.  Forces you to live up to Batman’s oft-forgotten title as “The World’s Greatest Detective?”  CHECK TO THE MATE (I bet Batman was good at chess, too).  You’ll also be pleased to know that many of Batman’s signature moves like the “cape-gliding two foot kick to the face”, and suspending criminals from gargoyle statues are present.

Batman: So, despite being shackled to this gurney, deep within this high-security facility specifically designed to contain villans of his lot, the Joker's still likely to escape fairly easily?  Gordon: Almost instantly.

Batman: "So, despite being shackled to this gurney, deep within this high-security facility specifically designed to contain villans of his lot, the Joker's still likely to escape fairly easily?" Gordon: "Almost instantly." Batman: "Sweet."

Those of you like myself who often forget the myriad of fighting combos that brawling games like this usually have, need not worry.  The game only has three combat buttons: attack, counter and block, and emphasizes the timing of these relative to your opponent’s actions, rather than combo-memorization.  Keep the combos flowing and you’ll do more damage, and get more experience from the fight, which can be used to purchase better armor or new skills.  It’s a very fitting style for the very technical and finesse sort of combat that Batman should be known for, instead of the over-sized brutish knuckle-dragger that some games have turned him into, a button-mashing thug, of sorts.  It’s also the kind of combat that’s just as rewarding to watch as it is to play, you can almost feel the impact of each weighted punch, both delivered and received. It’s also a great game if you like having a little dash of “adventure/exploration” gaming thrown in with your fisticuffs and hide-and-chokehold sessions.

Oftentimes, Batman will have to turn on a blue-tinged filter called “Detective Mode,” which allows him to see all the enemies in a room, as well as if they’re armed, and also their heart’s BPM (to measure their “fear” level).  But it also functions to allow Batman to highlight useful objects or clues (for example, in one area you must discover a trail of tobacco that Commissioner Gordon leaves) to assist Batman’s navigation of Arkham Asylum.  There’s also an unhealthy amount of riddles left for you to solve, appropriately enough, by The Riddler that ask you find a certain viewpoint or object, and upon completion reward you with bonus content and more experience.  Miss a couple?  You can return to Arkham after completing the game to tie up whatever loose ends you didn’t finish (or couldn’t finish) the first time round. Overall, if you’ve been waiting for someone to do Batman, the character, as well as the world of Gotham justice, look no further.  Playing as Batman is empowering without being superhuman, the audio/visual presentation rivals that of any top notch production effort, and getting to go head-to-head with Batman’s classic enemies is a pleasure unparalleled.  There’s so much more glowing praise I could give for this game, but let it be said that the successful delivery of an AMAZING Batman game is something even I was quite skeptical of.

Pick #2 Mass Effect (Platinum Hits Edition)–I know what you’re thinking, “Thanks Nick, for plugging a two-year-old game that everyone already played.”  While this is, to some degree, certainly a valid response, there are several pertinent reasons for excavating this “honestly, not that old” hit.  To begin with, some might have passed on Mass Effect in the past, (especially considering its ability to stay within the $40-60 price margin for a fairly long time) and just forgot about it.  Well, the times (and prices) are “a changin” and Bioware’s space opera is now a very affordable twenty bones.  You’re still not buying it, (in a metaphorical sense, obviously) are you?  What if I told you that the game was a two-disc set that included the “Bring Down the Sky” expansion pack, along with several “Behind the Scenes” documentaries, music, trailers, an art gallery and more?  To put it bluntly, you’re getting most of the stuff I had to pay an extra twenty dollars for in the Collector’s Edition.  You’re more or less buying the expansion and getting the game for free.  Even if you already own the regular edition of this game, the expansion and bonus content are more than worth a $20.  What more must I say to convince you that, at least from a budgetary standpoint, it’s a good buy?

If you get this game, get the box that looks EXACTLY like this.  If it lacks the obnxious stamp and the huge header, you are in posession of a cooler-looking, yet devoid of bonus content and expansion-less game.

If you get this game, get the box that looks EXACTLY like this. If it lacks the obnxious stamp and the huge header, you are in posession of a cooler-looking, yet devoid of bonus content and expansion-less game.

On the other hand, if you already own it, there’s still merit behind playing it again/finishing it/starting it.  To begin with, remember how Bioware promises that you can transfer your character from Mass Effect into the soon-to-be-released sequel?  Even though I have a faint suspicion that it might be your version of the protagonist that gets sucked out of that airlock that we’ve seen in commercials?  Well, those looking to play the sequel would do well to not have a shrimpy Commander Shepard for Maximum Alien Boobage Dos I mean, Mass Effect 2, and it wouldn’t hurt to play through the story to remember just how it all played out, though I’ve offered Cliffsnotes below for those less-inclined.

Recap of Mass Effect: Kaiden sucks.

But aside from being a great deal, and worth playing/replaying in preparation for Mass Effect 2, it’s worth discussing why the first installment has inherent merit.  Absolutely hate sci-fi as a genre?  Don’t like RPG/third-person action tactical shooters?  Hate having a five o’clock shadow?  Then stay away from Mass Effect.  Otherwise, there’s really no good reason to avoid Bioware’s masterful galaxy-hoppin’ adventure (aside from the few I mentioned in my article that highlighted the game’s “hyping” issues).

To provide a highly cursory plot summary, it’s the future, and humanity is the relative newcomer to a “UN of the Universe” organization of sorts.  You’re Commander Shepard, a Spectre agent (a “go anywhere, murder anything” no holds barred sort of individual) tasked with investigating a Spectre “gone rogue” named Saren who…oh, you know, may or may not be involved with an ancient mechanoid race that, rather than get their kicks at the local Old Country Buffet, spends their Sundays every couple milennia wiping out all sentient life on Earth.  And, of course, this involves chasing him across galaxies and galaxies, killing strange creatures with futuristic firearms and viewing blue alien sideboob. What’s great about this game is that you really have the power to make Shepard whatever the hell you want him/her to be.  Aside from deciding how your character looks, you also control if you’re more soldier (all around amazing will all weapons) Engineer (hacking, electronics, computers) or Adept (Biotics–telekinetic powers and variations on  such).  If that’s still a tough decision, there are three more “classes” to choose from that offer a hybrid of the classic three paths.  Also, if you enjoyed towing the line between a “First-rate Asshole” and “Goody-two-shoes extraordinaire” in Bioware’s past titles, Mass Effect brings that system back with weightier consequences to your choices.  Also, if you, like myself, found reading lines, selecting them, and having the character repeat the lines to be grating, worry no longer!  In Mass Effect, your conversation options are only the gist of what they’ll actually say when you select it.  It doesn’t sound like much, but it goes a LONG way in a dialogue-driven title like this.

Oh Ashley Williams, you can "join my party" any day of the week.  Even though you appear to be slightly Xenophobic and a bit of a religious fanatic.  At least you're not a whiny bitch like Kaiden.  "Ooh, they did experiments on me and messed with my brain, and now I'm a babbling mess of emotions."  Yes you are, Kaiden.  And that's exactly why you're not in my party.  Bitch.

Oh Ashley Williams, you can "join my party" any day of the week. Even though you appear to be slightly Xenophobic and a bit of a religious fanatic. At least you're not a whiny bitch like Kaiden. "Ooh, they did experiments on me and messed with my brain, and now I'm a babbling mess of self-loathing." Yes you are, Kaiden. And that's exactly why you're not in my party. Bitch.

Those who aren’t big proponents of the “I’ll just wait my turn to take this mace to your skull” RPG will find Mass Effect more to their tastes.  It’s a tactical cover-driven shooter that relies on the four essential groups of lead-spewing greatness: pistols, shotguns, sniper rifles and assault rifles.  Those expecting a gun expo’s worth of firearms, or having to carefully weigh one pistol’s attributes against another won’t find such here, though.  Like in most JRPGS, there’s always another weapon universally better than the one you have, and until you find it, there aren’t any difficult decisions to make.  There are modifiers to weapons, but because they’re universally applicable, interchangeable parts to some degree, your weapons lack inherent characteristics, and doesn’t allow one to boast to their friends about the new crazy weapon they’ve found.  Which is something I like to do. So, quick summary: Mass Effect is a shooter/RPG hybrid that has a great storyline, some genuinely riveting dialogue, and an equally impressive presentation, occasional streaming textures aside.  Those looking for an affordable and lengthy RPG, though not necessarily the easiest one out there, should look no further.  It’s the reason I bought a 360, people.  This game, and this game alone.  It’s the sort of HUGE game that almost cannot be done justice in a short multi-paragraph summary, but if you like sci-fi, and blasting strange creatures in the face with shotguns, you’re set.

Pick #3 BorderlandsOkay.  I love Borderlands.  I love knowing that because I’ve been dropped on a planet inhabited by criminals from “all walks of indecency” I don’t have to worry about who I put between my iron sights.  I love running people over with futuristic dune buggies, and then proceeding to loot their corpses for cash and rare firearms.  I love hearing bandits describe in disturbing detail just what they intend to do to my genitals once they get ahold of me, and then mow them all down with an electrically-charged sub machine gun.  I love buying scoped rocket launching shotguns from vending machines, and somehow, finding nothing in that sentence odd. My inherent and blatant biases aside, Borderlands is the panacea of shooters, a refreshing buckshot blast to the face in a genre that, aside from a few entries has begun calcifying into predictable cookie-cutter retreads.  We’ve seen a couple RPG/FPS mash-ups in the past couple years, but few could were still competent shooters, with the RPG stat management, equip-a-palooza removed.  I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE Fallout 3, but it just doesn’t look right when you empty entire SMG clips into an enemy’s head, only to have him shake it off like a bad migraine.  At least in Borderlands, enemies that take a small munitions stockpile to fell certainly look like it’d require such.  So, yes, FPS fans leery of that three letter word typically associated with moody effeminate protagonists sporting gravity-defying hair-dos…relax.

And you thought your "Senior Pictures" were awkward.  "Can...can you hold up your sniper rifle just a little more to the right...no, a little more...a little more..."

And you thought your "Senior Pictures" were awkward. "Can...can you hold up your sniper rifle just a little more to the right...no, a little more...a little more..."

Back to the game though.  Borderlands is a loot-powered shooter with light RPG elements.  After choosing one of four mercenaries that can be roughly classified as an elemental attacker, a brawler, a sniper, and your average soldier, you’re set loose on a planet appropriately named “Pandora” in search of a fabled treasure called “The Vault.”  Some people will help you, most will want to detach your testicles and play ping-pong with them, and a few will claim to be doing the former, only to really desire the latter (a la the “double cross”).  That’s basically the entire plot of the game.  If you’re the sort that requires multiple plot lines and fleshed-out characters, you might find Borderlands lacking in that regard.  Kill enemies, and you’ll level up.  Level up, and you’ll be given a point to spend on your abilities tree, unique to each of the characters, with each offering three paths to trace (though you’re free to distribute points amongst skills in all three, and you can respec your points at any point for a minor cost).

And these aren’t those sorts of “Boosts experience earned by 1%” weak-ass boosts you’ll find in other RPGS, the ones that have you wondering if, in fact, it’s actually “working.” These will have you shooting more bullets per shot, or boosting your gun’s clip size, amongst other things. Now, I can already see the RPG crowd in the corner adjusting their glasses and TIVO-ing the next SyFy direct-to-TV movie anxiously, wondering just what sort of stats they’re going to “number-crunch.”  What is a game, if not capable of being excessively quantified into Excel spreadsheets laden with varied forms of statistical break-downs?  Well, you guys can relax too, as you’ll spend hours and HOURS trying to weigh whether you’d prefer the higher-damage shotgun with an elemental bonus against armored foes, or the one that has the better fire-rate and clip size.  Maybe you’ll keep both, but as you’ll learn, you’ll want as many inventory slots free as possible when you head off on a quest for the looting that will inevitably ensue.  Now I know why the Vikings loved it so much.  This doesn’t even touch on the trading and bargaining that will inevitably ensue between your co-op buddies and yourself over all these weapons.

See that red box with the glowing green squares on it?  Thars be treasure, mateys!  (It's a weapons chest, and hopefully isn't full of crappy repeaters and rocket lauchers...ughh)

See that red box with the glowing green squares on it? Thars be treasure, mateys! (It's a weapons chest, and hopefully isn't full of crappy repeaters and rocket lauchers...ughh)

Borderlands is also loveable for its cel-shaded visuals, aiding in the “over-the-top-ness” feel that the game’s violence, dialogue, and characters exude.  It’s almost as if one’s Saturday morning cartoons merged with Quentin Tarantino in an unholy union of explosions and bloodshed.  Shooters have so frequently favored the “real” and the “graphic” that they’ve forgotten that not being certain whether to laugh or cringe can be a valued tool as well. Overall, Borderlands exudes madcap violence in a humorously demented world free of reason, logic, laws, and above all, peace.  It’s got a beautifully sick sense of humor, and isn’t afraid to flaunt it.  When you find characters hanging dead from ceiling fans…and laugh…you know you’re playing Borderlands. Or committing murder.  One of the two.

Pick #4 Far Cry 2–Overall, Far Cry 2 falls into the “middle of the pack” for a couple reasons.  It’s not as old as Mass Effect, but older than the rest.  It’s generally found going for the same price as Mass Effect, making it cheaper than the remaining two.  It also, in terms of critical appeal, found itself around the mid 80% mark where Borderlands is hovering, a little lower than Batman and Mass Effect.  I played it a bit in the spring, and picked it up again around early summer, but because my friend Kurt’s been doing a level design for his game design course I’ve seen a lot of the title lately.  And it got me to thinking.  Unlike it’s older FPS brother, the first Far Cry, made by Crytek (developers of the “your computer will never be able to handle this title” Crysis) the second installment got buried in the flood of quality titles that appeared around the holidays of 2008.  People weren’t certain why they weren’t playing as Jack Carver, why they were in barren Africa (no offense, Africa, it’s not personal, just geographical) instead of the lush Caribbean, and (if the player had played the Xbox console Far Cry ports, quality ones, mind you) why they no longer had any mutant/feral powers (it’s a long story).

Many avoided having to ask any of these questions altogether and jumped into the tried-and-true competency of Far Cry 2′s multiplayer mode. But that’s just me “setting the scene” for those who don’t refresh their RSS feed reader on Far Cry related updates every five seconds.  Interestingly enough, my plugging of Far Cry 2 comes in two separate stages, the initial reasons I was drawn to the title, and the reasons I played it around the time I picked it up, and those that I gained when returning to the title several months later.  Video games, like books and movies, “read” differently when approached multiple times, it would appear.  Anyway, I was first drawn to the game when EDGE magazine did an editorial on it back in December of 2007.  They talked about the 24/7 clock and dynamic weather system, as well as, and prominently, the FIRE engine.  They went on and on and on about how wind direction, the material set on fire, the surrounding environment, how ALL of this would influence this “smart” fire.  I, of course wondered just how relevant this was, as wind direction is quite inconsequential when my flamethrower’s halfway down the guy’s throat.  But it was interesting nonetheless.  When I read on to hear how your character is searching for diamonds, and has to combat the weather conditions, as well as malaria (talk about stepping into the wrong pair of shoes, right?) I was even more interested.  Disease-ridden and disoriented with heatstroke?  SIGN ME UP.

Unlike in real life, I can successfully set an alarm in Far Cry 2, so I'm up in time to see the sun rise...or even get up before noon.

Unlike in real life, I can successfully set an alarm in Far Cry 2, so I'm up in time to see the sun rise...or even get up before noon.

All joking aside, it was the simplistic and ascetic approach to the environment that appealed to me.  There were no health upgrades or options to excessively “pimp out” your weapon.  No special skills to learn, or “bail-out” maneuvers one could utilize when put in a tight spot.  No regenerating “overshields” or “hide for 30 seconds and watch that gaping chest wound heal right back up.”  None of that.  It was just you and your guns, provided you could afford some.  Sure, you could just take guns off enemies, but their’s are mostly rusted, and result in you having to desperately tap the “X” button when your weapon jams.  This game isn’t about getting BFGs (Big Fucking Guns, for those unaware) it’s about getting guns that work. This brings a true sense of desperation to every encounter with either the rebel underground movement or the current government’s military forces, and there’s a genuine chance that until one spends a couple hours getting a feel for the game, any firefight could result in your death.

Luckily, you’ve got allies you can befriend that will wait for you at safehouses, and for the most part, leave you alone, unless you’re at the brink of death.  If you don’t put them in a “no-win” scenario, they’ll usually revive you to a minimal amount, gun down a few guys, and leave.  If mortally wounded however, their death is permanent.  You’re not Superman, and the same goes for your allies. Picking up quests/missions is no different, you’ll have to spend sometimes fifteen minutes (depending on how accessible your destination is from the three to four bus stops) driving to the spot, often having to “run” guard checkpoints, who will usually give chase, and if not addressed (depending on the speed of your vehicle) will generally murder you.  That’s not even addressing enemy safehouses and guard patrols.  It’s a dangerous, dangerous place people, and for a neurotic “they’re all out to get me” gamer, it’s one well suited to my neuroses.  Of course, it’s also hard to focus on the road when marveling at the scenery and wide-open atmosphere Ubisoft has crafted.  The flora and fauna, the sunsets and rainstorms, the ever-beating sun, its all there and almost overwhelming to take in all at once.  The presentation isn’t as well-polished for characters, but it’s still more than competent for a game that is mostly concerned with rendering your gun and the hands holding it.

Speaking of which, I LOVE all the MANY animations Far Cry 2 has for the hands, whether its digging bullets out of your leg, stabbing yourself with sterettes, holding out your map, grabbing onto the top of a dune buggy as you swing yourself into the seat, or even as you pull out your gun to put your ally out of his misery.  They’re all wonderfully crafted, and really make one not feel like they’re playing a “blank slate” placeholder of a character, but an actual extension of self.  It almost adds a tactile dimension to the whole thing. Again, great environments, mercenary-accurate firearms, realistic gunplay, huge map, and dynamic day/night/weather system.  But, as the old acting saying goes, “What’s my motivation?”  Sure, I’m trying to hunt down the arms dealer, the Jackal, who left me for dead, but considering that appearances (and even mere mentions) of said gunrunner are few and far between at the beginning half of the game, the game seems to drift into murder-driven fetch quests, you’re a courier of death, if you will.  And when you aren’t murdering political figures from the warring factions, you’re murdering gunrunners for the local arms merchants.  I didn’t find it particularly motivating, or chock-full of that “what happens next” element that successful narratives strive for. It’s part of the reason I put it down in the first place.

Aaaaand...this is what things tend to look like shortly after sunrise.  For the rest of the day.

Aaaaand...this is what things tend to look like shortly after sunrise. For the rest of the day.

Yet, when I returned to it several months later, fresh off of completely my capstone Literary Theory course, I began to think of the narrative (as intended) as having an extended metaphorical allegory to Heart of Darkness.  When you realize that nobody’s truly the “good” or “bad” guy, and that your own morality is ambiguous at best, the game becomes quite frightening.  When one considers the perpetual “pawn” your character is, always doing missions without a “big picture” understanding of just why you’re doing it, it’s frightening.  It really is.  Nietzsche would have had a “field day” with the veiled nihilism of Far Cry 2. Life’s dangerous, confusing, and riddled with angry and deceptive people that see you as nothing more than a means to their  ends..and you’re perfectly alright with that.  Even thinking about the game makes me want to paint my face like The Crow and go brood in a corner of my room.

Anyway.  Go play ‘em.

2 Comments

    And Then in the end Batman spun the wheel of fate to show that there was no treasure in vault 107, but instead found a whiny little bitch who 10 seconds later would kill himself with a thermal nuclear bomb. Then they went on safari.

    Goodnight

  • Oh how i agree with you, sir.

    I just watched the RevRant video on “Disempowerment” and realized again how much i loved FarCry 2 (as well as Fallout 3 and other games that didn’t make your list). I remembered how many times i was trapped in a gunfight with limited ammo and/or breaking guns and had to improvise to survive and escape/kill everyone.

    I found that it was moments like this, where i was not necessarily the most powerful person in the room, when i had the most fun; having to be quick and resourceful.

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